Talking Mental Health: 5 Reasons to Talk About Your Mental Health

In this world, it’s always too easy to close yourself off from others and keep your mental health woes to yourself. A lot of the time, you may feel crazy for feeling the way that you do and you can’t relate to others, simply because everybody else seems to have their life together and they project a healthy life; however, the reality of the situation is that many of the people in your day-to-day life can relate to how you are feeling and they will be there for you if you ask for their help.

These are some reasons to talk about your mental health, whether this be with a loved one, a therapist/counsellor or just a voice on the other end of the telephone such as the Samaritans. If you’re struggling to talk, you’ve come to the right place.

1. You Owe it to Yourself

You have been fighting this mental illness on your own for far too long, whether you’ve only recently been stricken with it or you’ve been dealing with it for years. It is mentally exhausting and keeping it bottled up is not doing you any good whatsoever. You owe yourself a break from fighting and the best and healthiest way to do that is to talk to somebody about it. It gives you a feeling of relief and release that nothing else can give. You don’t even need to delve deeply into the subject; you can just tell somebody how you’re feeling to get it off your chest. Once you’ve gotten it out in the open, you will notice an immediate release and you can take a well earned break from stressing about everything. Plus, you never know, whoever you talk to may also be able to give some helpful advice regarding your stresses or your mental health.

2. It Raises Awareness

This is a very important reason for me. If more people talked about their mental health, there would be so much more societal awareness and it would help to fight the stigma. One of the reasons that mental health has been stigmatised is because there is a lack of understanding on the subject. The more that people talk about it, the more that people will understand about it. Whether that just means the number of people suffering with poor mental health becomes more common knowledge or it means that more people come to empathise with others who are struggling, it will be a step in the right direction. Talk about your mental illness and fight the stigma!

3. It Helps Your Loved Ones

Now, don’t get me wrong, your mental health is all about you and nothing will change that. It may be strange at first to think that talking about your mental health could help your loved ones but it really does help them. The reason I say this is because your friends and family worry about you. When you’re closing yourself off, they worry about what might be wrong with you. It doesn’t matter how many times you tell them you’re fine, they’re not stupid and they will always see through it. They can see that you are suffering and if you keep everything to yourself then it will only make them feel worse. Talk to them about whatever is bothering you. Talk to them about your mental illness and how it makes you feel and act. If they even begin to understand what is going on in your head and why you are retreating all the time, they will worry less and they may even get to know how to help you in your dark times.

4. It Puts Things Into Perspective

One of the worst things about keeping things bottled up is that things get blown way out of proportion when they are kept in your head. You will over think things and build them up to the point where it becomes unbearable. That is dangerous. Both for you and for those around you. Your behaviour has the potential to be very unpredictable when you build things up to that point. It has the potential to make you suicidal. Please do everything you can to stop things from building up like that. The first place to start is to talk about it. This puts things into perspective and allows you to see the issue for what it is; not for what it’s been built up to in your mind. Merely talking about how you are feeling will put it into words, which can be analysed. Talking about it also makes it a tangible thing, which can be looked back on with hindsight. If you keep it bottled up, it only exists in your head and can’t be tangible; for you or for your loved ones. Put it out there. Get it into a tangible form and use it as a tool to help your mental health.

5. It Encourages Others to Talk

We all like to relate to other people. There is not another feeling like it. Part of relating to others is being able to imitate good behaviour or take inspiration from somebody else. In my case, it was when I started reading other people’s blogs that I started relating to people from a mental health perspective. I could see that these people were talking about their illnesses, which must have taken a lot of courage. It was this courage from other people that inspired me to talk about my own mental illness. I like to think that other people reading my blog have taken inspiration to do the same. If even one person has been spurred on by my posts to talk about their mental health, that is an amazing thing to me. Now it’s your turn. I hope that reading this post has helped you to see that talking about it is very, very important and I hope that it may inspire you to do so.

Don’t be afraid to talk. Don’t let the stigma drag you down. Don’t let things build up in your head. Don’t let your loved ones worry about you all the time. Don’t feed the stigma that is stopping others from coming out.

Talk about it.

Love and Peace

Guest of A Bearded Man: BUSTING THE MYTHS SURROUNDING ANXIETY

Guest of A Bearded Man

It’s time for my first ever guest feature on this blog! Are you as excited as I am!?

 

I reached out to the blogging community, hoping that other bloggers would be interested in working with me. I got a very good response and am delighted to begin a guest feature series: Guest of A Bearded Man. This series will feature a variety of bloggers and it will not be tied down to a specific niche. This will be all about supporting my fellow writers and introducing my followers to new blogs. I hope you will enjoy it and that you will join me in celebrating and supporting the talent that is being featured.

 

This week’s Guest of a Beard is none other than Gabrielle Isaac Allison, better known as TheOpinionatedOne. Gabrielle is a Lifestyle and Christianity blogger who, for this feature, has delved into the realms of mental health and anxiety. This is a deep dive into the myths surrounding it, which I must say I found fascinating to read.

 

Enjoy!

 

BUSTING THE MYTHS SURROUNDING ANXIETY

I felt chained to my bed. Although I heard the laughter of my friends echoing down the hall in our little apartment, I couldn’t get up to go in the living room and partake of whatever fun they were having.

 

It was weird. I felt my face, and tears were streaming down. What happened? I didn’t do anything to hurt myself, and I wasn’t feeling sad. It just hit me. It reminded me of my high school days on the field throwing shotput and discus.

 

One day at practice, my coach was demonstrating the proper discus throwing techniques, not realizing I was in her line of fire. The discus shot out of her hand like a rocket and hit me square in my back, right between my shoulders.

 

That’s how I felt. Like all of the breath had been knocked out of me in one sudden, unexpected slam of emotion.

 

That’s my anxiety. But, the word anxiety is so overused now, in my opinion, that it has lost its meaning. Because so many people don’t understand this mental health problem, there are a lot of myths and issues surrounding it. Today, I want to bust some of those myths to set the record straight. Let’s get into this:

 

All People With Anxiety Are Sad

ALL PEOPLE WITH ANXIETY ARE SAD

Anxiety affects people in a lot of different ways. For some people, depression is coupled with anxiety. For others, however, anxiety is just some weird chemical experience that causes us to get really worried and anxious out of nowhere.

 

This mental health issue is by no means a one size fits all issue. People with anxiety are very different and should be treated differently in many respects.

 

All in Your HEad

ANXIETY IS ALL IN YOUR HEAD

I used to attend a church where I was told that I wasn’t attending enough. I wasn’t attending often because I was having physical issues that were stemming from my anxiety attacks. Anxiety starts in your head. For some reason, your brain sends signals that are different than those sent by another person’s brain.

 

These signals cause your body to react in different and uncomfortable ways. For me, my hormones went crazy. As a woman, you can guess how hard it has impacted my body. So, anxiety may start in your brain, but it does work its way throughout your body. It is real and it is a debilitating disease.

 

All People with Anxiety are Socially Awkward

ALL PEOPLE WITH ANXIETY ARE SOCIALLY-AWKWARD

Social anxiety is by far one of the most common forms of anxiety, but it is by no means the only form of anxiety. Take me for example. I’m a very sociable person. I once had a teacher tell me that I live up to my nickname, Gabbie, because I just wouldn’t stop chatting with my friends in class.

 

I would say that I have a lot of medical anxiety (where you worry you have medical issues and your body starts to give you pseudo-symptoms of that issue). This impacts my day-to-day life and can turn a good day bad really quickly!

 

Christians

PEOPLE WITH ANXIETY CAN’T BE CHRISTIANS

I take my Christian faith very seriously. A lot of people have insinuated that anxiety is not a trait for a Christian because we are supposed to “cast our cares upon the Lord.” To that, I usually retort that Jesus has a bit of anxiety when he cried blood in the garden the night before he was to be tried and crucified.

 

Hormonal changes and high stress can cause someone to cry blood, so I’d say he was significantly anxious, even asking God to take the responsibility off of him, if he could.

 

Just Get Over it, Don't Think About It

JUST GET OVER IT AND DON’T THINK ABOUT IT

If people could get over it and prevent suicidal thoughts, worrying about their bodies, worrying how they came across to someone, or having an anxiety attack for no explainable reason, don’t you think they would?

 

I know that I would much rather abstain from these things, but it isn’t that simple. Controlling your anxiety often takes counseling and/or medication, a luxury not many people can afford! That’s why breaking the stigma of anxiety is so important. It helps us present one unified fight in solidarity against this mental health issue.

 

CONCLUSION

That’s it. Those are the things I wanted to set straight. I hope you have a new and improved understanding of anxiety!

 

About Our Guest

Gabrielle Isaac Allison graduated with a BA in Mass Communication and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog, TheOpinionatedOne.com, features posts on the topics of health and wellness, Christianity and religion, mysteries, entertainment, lifestyle, and more.

 

You can find Gabrielle on her social media links below:

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